The Red Cross in Europe – 1903

The Red Cross in Europe – 1903

Excerpt from The Westminster Review Volume 159 – published in 1903

Under the banner of the Red Cross marches a greater army than ever mustered any other flag that floats. Stars and Stripes, Union Jack, banners of France, Germany, and Russia, all of them yield, in glory and sovereignty, to the banner that bears the message of love, healing, and peace.

For more than thirty years that Red Cross flag has been flying on the battlefields of Europe, and kings, queens, and people of every rank have paid homage to its colours.

More glorious than battle’s victory, more honouring than worldly conquest, are the triumphs of the Red Cross. Britain’s Empress, the Presidents of France and the United States, the Emperors of Germany, Austria, and Russia, and the kings and princes of every nation in Europe, hold that flag as sacred and inviolate as their religion; and they would sooner trample their national flag in the dust than do aught that would cast dishonour on the Red Cross flag of Geneva.

Men and nations for five thousand years have been warring against each other, and deluging the earth with their blood, before the pioneers of Red Cross brought about that Red Cross Conference which met at Geneva on the morning of October 26, [1863]. At that Conference fourteen Governments were represented; and the result of their deliberations was the Convention of Geneva, which has been adopted by all the nations of the world, except China, Mexico, and Brazil.

Travel where we may in almost every part of the globe we shall behold the sign or flag of the Red Cross of Geneva on the steppes of Russia, in far Siberia, among the mosques and minarets of Turkey, in the cities of Persia, on the flag-staffs of the Argentine Republic, on the mountains of San Salvador, in the passes of Roumania, high up amid the snow-clad heights of Chili, by the fiords of Norway and dykes of Holland, in the Alps of Switzerland, on the shores of Italy, in the vine-clad valleys of France, in the castles and cottages of Germany, on the banks of the St. Lawrence and Ottawa, Hudson, and Mississippi, from the Golden Horn of the Bosphorus to the Golden Gates of San Francisco, in Asia, Africa, and every corner of Britain’s Empire go where we will, from sea to sea and continent to continent and we shall still see that Red Cross flag of Geneva, proclaiming to the world its glorious message of peace and good-will.

Excerpt from The Westminster Review Volume 159 – published in 1903

===+++===

Further Reading and External links

International Committee of the Red Cross – War and Law

Henry Durant